SolidWorks and 3D CAD Books

Blog - Solidworks

 

  • Hansen, L. Scott. Applied SolidWorks. 1st ed. New York: Industrial Press, c2006.
  • Planchard, David C., and Marie P. Plachard. A Commands Guide for SolidWorks 2009. 1st ed. Ed. Stacy Masucci. Clifton Park, NY: Delmar Cengage Learning, 2009.
  • Bethune, James D. Engineering Design and Graphics with SolidWorks. 1st ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2010.
  • Murray, David. Inside SolidWorks. 4th ed. Clifton Park, NY: Thomson/Delmar Learning, c2006.
  • Howard, William E., and Joseph C. Musto. Introduction to Solid Modeling using SolidWorks. 3rd ed. Dubuque, IA: McGraw-Hill, c2008.
  • Howard, William E., and Joseph C. Musto. Introduction to Solid Modeling using SolidWorks 2006. Boston: McGraw-Hill, c2007.
  • Howard, William E., and Joseph C. Musto. Introduction to Solid Modeling using SolidWorks 2008. New York: McGraw-Hill Higher Education, c2009.
  • Howard, William E., and Joseph C. Musto. Introduction to Solid Modeling using SolidWorks 2009. Boston: McGraw-Hill Higher Education, c2010.
  • Hansen, L. Scott. Learning and Applying SolidWorks 2007-2008 Step-by-Step. 2nd ed. New York: Industrial Press, c2008.
  • Short, Thomas, and Michael Pritchett. Learning SolidWorks 2009. 1st ed. Tinley Park: Goodheart-Willcox Company, 2009.
  • Short, Thomas, and Michael Pritchett. Learning SolidWorks 2010. Tinley Park: Goodheart-Willcox Company, 2010.
  • Baxter, Douglas H. Solid Modeling using SolidWorks 2004: A DVD Introduction. Clifton Park, NY: Thomson Delmar Learning, c2005.
  • Lombard, Matt. SolidWorks 2007 Bible. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, c2007.
  • Lombard, Matt. SolidWorks 2009 Bible. 1st ed. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley, 2009.
  • Lombard, Matt, Jeremy Sierra, and Kent Sharkey. SolidWorks 2010 Bible. 1st ed. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley, 2010.
  • Ruiz, Alex. SolidWorks 2010: No Experience Required. 1st ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley Technology, c2010.
  • Lombard, Matt, and L. Christine Wheeler. SolidWorks Administration Bible. 1st ed. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley, 2009.
  • Jankowski, Greg, and Richard Doyle. SolidWorks For Dummies. 2nd ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2008.
  • Jankowski, Greg. SolidWorks for Dummies. 2nd ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2008.
  • Jankowski, Greg. SolidWorks for Dummies. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, c2005.
  • Valentino, James, and Nicholas DiZinno. SolidWorks for Technology and Engineering. 1st ed. New York: Industrial Press, c2010.
  • Lombard, Matt. SolidWorks Surfacing and Complex Shape Modeling Bible. 1st ed. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley, 2008.
  • Besterfield, Dale H., and Robert E. O’Hagan. Technical Sketching with an Introduction to 2D and 3D CAD: For Engineers, Technologists, and Technicians. 4th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, c2007.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

SolidWorks Products

Blog - Solidworks

 

- SolidWorks Premium

  • Mechanical CAD Capabilities
  • Design Validation Capabilities
  • PDM Capabilities

- Simulation

  • SolidWorks Simulation
  • SolidWorks Simulation Professional
  • SolidWorks Simulation Premium
  • SolidWorks Flow Simulation
  • SolidWorks SimulationXpress

- SolidWorks Sustainability

- SolidWorks PDM

  • SolidWorks Enterprise PDM
  • SolidWorks Workgroup PDM

- 3DVIA Composer

- Educational Products

  • SolidWorks Student Edition Software
  • SolidWorks Education Edition Software
  • SolidWorks University Research License

- Free CAD Tools

  • eDrawings Viewer
  • SolidWorks Explorer

- Free 2D Tools

  • DraftSight
  • eDrawings Viewer
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

SolidWorks – A 3D Mechanical CAD (Computer-Aided Design) Program

Blog - Solidworks

Earliest name/version: SolidWorks 95

Most recent name/version: Solidworks 2010 SP3.1

“SolidWorks is a 3D mechanical CAD (computer-aided design) program that runs on Microsoft Windows and was developed by Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp., a subsidiary of Dassault Systèmes, S. A.” It was started in Concord, Massachusetts by a team of engineers who were recruited by Jon Hirschtick to develop 3D CAD software. A million licenses were sold, and Sheffield Telegraph considered SolidWorks as “the world’s most popular CAD software.”

“SolidWorks is a parasolid-based solid modeler, and utilizes a parametric feature-based approach to create models and assemblies.” SolidWorks uses parameters which are either numeric or geometric. Numeric parameters use relations to capture the design intent. The design intent is “how the creator of the part wants it to respond to changes and updates.” The part’s building blocks are called features, and they are either shape-based or operation-based. Usually, a SolidWorks model starts with a 2D sketch. Dimensions are added and relations are used. The two determines the geometry of the model. SolidWorks has advanced mating features and roll back features (which allow users to go back to a part’s history and do some changes in the part). Parts or assemblies can be sources for a drawing. SolidWorks uses the Microsoft structured storage file format, which allows other files to be embedded to SolidWorks files.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A New Programming Add-In for SolidWorks: BobCAM for SolidWorks

Blog - Solidworks

 

BobCAD-CAM released a new programming add-in for SolidWorks called BobCAM for SolidWorks. BobCAM allows users to utilize its two- to four-axis machining capabilities, which are fully associative with the part model. Any machining strategy, such as tool pattern and cutting condition, is either associative with a specific part or with the entire system. Other functionalities of BobCAM include profiling, pocketing, engraving, etc. BobCAM has a customizable material and tool database and post processors for some machines.


Reference:
“‘Fully Integrated’ BobCAM for SolidWorks CAM Software.” American Machinist. 24 June 2010. 14 July 2010 <http://www.americanmachinist.com/304/Issue/Article/False/85927/Issue>.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Add-In for SolidWorks 3D Mechanical CAD (MCAD): Shapeways Add-In

Blog - Solidworks

 

Shapeways and Design Solutions introduced a SolidWorks 3D mechanical CAD (MCAD) add-in that allows SolidWorks users to 3D print designs in materials such as stainless steels, glasses, full color sandstones, etc. To do this, users must install the add-in, open a SolidWorks model, login to Shapeways, and save to Shapeways. According to Peter Weijmarshausen, CEO of Shapeways, the add-in “makes it easier… to turn 3D designs into physical objects.” The Shapeways add-in is available for free at the Design Solutions website.


Reference:
“Shapeways Offers 3D Print Add In for SolidWorks.” Ten Links. 24 June 2010. 14 July 2010 <http://www.tenlinks.com/news/PR/shapeways/062410_3d_print_addin.htm>

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
More Articles...